The Town of Montezuma, Colorado is named for Montezuma, the Emperor of the Aztecs. It consists largely of historical buildings and houses lining unpaved streets at the end of the paved county road that ascends the Snake River from Keystone near the west side of Loveland Pass. The town sits in a high steep valley surrounded by forested peaks offering good access to higher national forest land destinations. The paved road up from Keystone leads mainly through national forest right up to the entrance of town. The town retains many older structures, some of them dating from the late 19th century, such as the picturesque school house dating from the 1880s, now a State of Colorado Historical Site. The town is often included in lists of ghost towns in the Colorado Rockies, but it nevertheless retains a small population of full-time residents as well as some second homeowners. It is the smallest town in NWCCOG’s Region, with a population of 71 full-time residents.

Key Stats

 Population (2017)Population Change (2010-2017)Median Household IncomeTotal Housing UnitsNumber of HouseholdsPercentage of Vacant/Seasonal UnitsPercentage Age 25+ with BA or Higher DegreeMedian AgePercentage of Hispanic Residents
Montezuma, CO673.1%60,000502640%44.3%30.80
Source: Colorado State Demography Office

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 5-Year Estimates, 2017